Volkswagen, Skoda, and Seat will share more parts under their unique bodies

Volkswagen Group will utilize more common parts in future models by its inexpensive core brands VW, Seat, and Skoda to enhance economy by 20%.

Volkswagen Group will utilize more common parts in future models by its inexpensive core brands VW, Seat, and Skoda to enhance economy by 20%.

Volkswagen is a pioneer in sharing platforms between models of different sizes and brands, but CEO Thomas Schaefer wants to simplify things even more.

Schaefer told Bloomberg, "We wasted too much time worrying about one other." The competition is outside, not within the organization," indicating the future strategy for related brands.

The executive said design will differentiate VW Group's main brands. The VW Up!, Skoda Citigo, and Seat Mii trio are notable examples of badge-engineering.

VW Polo, Seat Ibiza, and Skoda Fabia superminis have individual exterior and interior designs while sharing everything else.

The next VW Passat and Skoda Superb could be even more similar to save money. Both models' production will transfer from Germany and the Czech Republic to Slovakia.

VW, Skoda, and Seat account for 80% of the group's global sales, so a 20% efficiency boost would save a lot.

VW Group wants to invest in EVs to compete with single-brand corporations like Tesla and multi-brand groups like Stellantis. Trinity, a series of EVs due in 2026 and made in a $2 billion EV facility, is an example.

High-end companies like Audi, Porsche, and Bentley will likely retain more independence when it comes to technical components and unique features.

After returning to profitability in 2021 and growing EV sales, VW hopes to leave its niche market role in the US. The company will produce more electric cars in the US.

Schaefer alluded to two new US-built SUVs, a battery research facility, and a battery plant. China is a key market for VW Group, which wants to sell new products to Chinese clients.