German authorities raid Hyundai, Kia offices for diesel cheating devices

German officials raided eight Hyundai and Kia locations in Germany and Luxembourg, suspecting fraud. Prosecutors allege the gadgets decrease or abolish emission controls in diesel-powered automobiles.

140 detectives swarmed the eight places, Handelsblatt reported, looking for evidence. If accurate, around 210,000 automobiles have emissions-cheating technology that performs better in tests than in real life.

The autos were sold until 2020, according to prosecutors. Neither automaker has sold a diesel-powered car in the U.S., thus this raid is European. 

The autos were sold until 2020, according to prosecutors. Neither automaker has sold a diesel-powered car in the U.S., thus this raid is European. 

Bloomberg thinks it's likely that the cheating software came from Bosch and erstwhile Delphi Technologies, which BorgWarner acquired in 2020.

BorgWarner has said it's cooperating with authorities, and Bosch claims it settled with Stuttgart prosecutors in 2019.

That seems these dominoes have been falling for more than two years, and it also indicates officials conducting the raid are certain they'll uncover more evidence to back up the charges. Kia and Hyundai aren't the first to cheat diesel emissions.

Many recall Volkswagen's 2015 emissions-cheating admission. Similar to these assertions, VW products allowed for less pollution control during normal driving than on a test rig.