2023 Toyota Crown Is A Crossover-ish Sedan Replacing Avalon

Toyota revealed plans to phase out the Avalon by the end of 2022. The 2023 Crown will replace it this fall.

Time and numerous viewings have dulled the original shock. Toyota reinvented the full-size Avalon for the crossover age. It has crossover-inspired body covering and an increased riding height.

Toyota understood sustaining the status quo was a losing struggle. Consumers overwhelmingly choose crossovers over sedans.

Sedans are acquiring crossover features like all-wheel drive and plastic body wrapping. If the AMC Eagle inspired today's crossover.

The Crown has a sleek design that borrows from the bZ4X. While the front aspect has been criticized, the sedan's flowing shape, elegant top, and 19- and 21-inch wheels are appealing.

The Crown's trunk looks little from the outside but is huge when opened. This reviewer easily fit inside before folding down the back seats, although Toyota hasn't revealed U.S. specs yet.

The Crown will be Toyota's top mainstream sedan, but the inside belies that. Black plastic dominates the cabin, with occasional silver or bronze accents.

Upgrading to the Limited grade adds macadamia, black and chestnut, and black leather seats.

The inside has a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster and a 12.3-inch Toyota Audio Multimedia system. The latter has better visuals, cloud-based navigation, over-the-air upgrades, and an Intelligent Assistant that answers to "Hey, Toyota."

The variant comes with heated front seats with eight-way power adjustment, fabric, and Softex upholstery. The base Crown XLE has dual-zone climate control, a smartphone charger, and six speakers.

Limited includes heated, ventilated leather front and rear seats. Other features include a fixed glass roof and 11-speaker JBL audio system.

Rear seats are roomy but lack the Avalon's limo-like legroom. The Crown is 48 mm shorter and has a 20 mm shorter wheelbase, so this isn't surprising. This 6' 2" scribe had plenty of legroom and headroom.

Toyota is keeping quiet on some U.S. details, although the car will include two hybrid powertrains.

The Crown XLE and Limited include a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, two electric motors, an electronically controlled CVT, and a high-output bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery.

The Japanese variation has 231 horsepower (172 kW / 234 PS) and the US-spec vehicle should have similar power. Toyota USA predicts 38 mpg regardless of final numbers.

We prefer the Crown Platinum's Hybrid Max powerplant. It has a turbocharged 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, a front electric motor that boosts torque, a rear eAxle, and a direct shift six-speed automatic transmission with a wet start clutch.

We prefer the Crown Platinum's Hybrid Max powerplant. It has a turbocharged 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, a front electric motor that boosts torque, a rear eAxle, and a direct shift six-speed automatic transmission with a wet start clutch.

This offers the automobile 340 horsepower and a 0-60 mph pace of 5.9 seconds. The Platinum's performance costs it 28 mpg, however. That's 10 mpg less than other Crown versions and much below the Avalon Hybrid's 44 mpg combined. The eco-friendly Avalon lacked all-wheel drive and had 215 horsepower (218 PS).

Crowns have standard all-wheel drive. XLE and Limited models have E-Four AWD with a rear-mounted electric motor. The Crown Platinum has a nicer E-Four Advanced AWD system with a water-cooled rear eAxle.

The E-Four Advanced AWD system can split power between 70:30 and 20:80, whereas the E-Four AWD system can deliver 100% to the front wheels.